Monthly Archives: May 2015

WORKING WITH PERSPECTIVE – AERIAL OR ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVE

Well, I just realized that I had not posted anything about working with perspective — both aerial and linear.  This is an omission my teaching career couldn’t withstand! So I’m going to write a few posts about this subject before giving up!

If you are a realistic painter, or just want to show some depth in your paintings, you need to know something about perspective. 

THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF PERSPECTIVE: AERIAL AND LINEAR

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE OR ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVE:  If you have drawn or painted a still life subject, you probably wanted to show these objects in space.  It was shallow space, of course, but was still important.  In a landscape, aerial perspective is most important, since you usually have a foreground, a middle ground, and a background.  How do you effectively represent these different planes?

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE INCLUDES THESE ELEMENTS: 

  1. OVERLAPPING
  2. DETAIL
  3. VALUE
  4. INTENSITY
  5. POSITION
  6. SIZE.

If you look at two objects in space that are similar, but one is farther away than the other, what happens?  The one farther away looks smaller, lighter in value, lower in intensity, not as clearly defined, and may be overlapped by the one in front.  Take a look at this example:

Cloudy Skies

How do you know which tree is the closest even though the other trees may be the same size?  It is larger, close to the bottom of the picture plane, in more detail, darker, and overlaps the trees and mountains in the distance.  What happens to the trees and mountains in the distance?  They are lighter in value, less intense, show no detail, are much smaller.  The mountains in particular are low in intensity, appearing more lavender and gray. 

 

farmlandHere’s is another example:  In this painting, we know that the hay bale on the bottom left is much closer to the viewer than the others because of its position.  Is there a definite foreground, middle ground, and background here?  The foreground hill is more golden (more intense) than the three other hills as they move backward in space.  It’s important to look closely at the natural landscape to see how this works.

My next posts will be about linear perspective — this is what happens when people start putting buildings, houses, barns, etc. in the landscape!

 

 

 

 

 

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DRAWING THE HUMAN FIGURE

It’s been a while since I blogged — had a lot going on in my life lately.  Today, I’m merely passing along some information about drawing the human form that I’ve gleaned from books and magazines.  Unfortunately, I have no idea WHAT books and magazines I got these from.  Suffice it to say that my students learned a lot from these charts.  The first one is about the growth of children. You can see from this why babys’ heads and eyes always seem to be so big– they don’t grow as fast as the other parts of the body.  I apologize for the darkness of the example — it was on colored paper!

 Growth chart

This next chart illustrates how the different sections of the body can be seen as basic forms: cylinders, spheres, wedges. It is much easier to draw figures if you think about various parts as simply shapes and forms.

shapes of body

In the future, I probably will not be posting drawing/painting lessons from my classes.  Instead, I will be sharing the artwork I have finished lately, or working on at the present.  I may be hanging up my apron as an art teacher!  At least for the summer!  Happy drawing to all of you!