Category Archives: COMPOSITION AND DESIGN

NEW CLASS IN MAUMELLE

farmlandWell, I’m going to teach an art class again — thought I was finished with that, but guess it’s in my “blood.”  Beginning September 15 (Thursday) from 1:30 – 3:30, I will be teaching a class on how to compose a work of art at the Maumelle Senior Wellness Center in Maumelle.  This is a seven week class, and will include examples, critiques, information, exercises, and perhaps occasional homework.  Students will use their own materials, as well as materials provided by the instructor.  I’ve had many years of experience teaching this subject, both in high school art classes, children’s classes, and adult classes.  A lot of the lessons will be based on the blogs I’ve shared on this site.  Cost is $45, and there is a maximum of eight students so call MSWC as soon as possible, if you want to register  (501- 851-4344).   I’m looking forward to seeing you and sharing my understanding of composition and design principles.

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RECENT EXHBITIONS AND AWARDS

With Strings AttachedMAS

This watercolor painting titled “With Strings Attached” recently won the Bronze Award at the Arkansas League of Artists Spring Members’ Show at the Cox Creative Center in downtown Little Rock.  It is on 300 # cold-press Arches watercolor paper and framed to 29 x 37.”  I don’t usually paint in watercolor, and this was not an easy piece for me to create.  I saw the aprons hanging in a studio at the Arkansas Arts Center, and thought they would make a pleasing composition with some alterations on my part.  I tried to create visual interest and movement by varying the colors, patterns,, and sizes of the aprons and shirts. It was quite a challenge!  This same piece won the Wiggins award at the MSW Annual Competition at the Arkansas Arts Center and 1st place at the Stuttgart Grand Prairie Arts Festival in 2015.  The show at the Cox Creative Center will hang until April 30.

Currently on display, one of my pastel paintings  was juried into the Wichita Pastel National Show in Kansas — the same piece won 2nd place at the Delta Arts Festival in Newport this year.  From April to May 11, I have 3 artworks at the Conway League of Artists Show at the Faulkner County Library in Conway.  In addition, a charcoal drawing of my husband’s arms will be published in the Art Coffee Table Book of Arkansas Hospice.  Date of publication is unknown at this time.

If anyone is interested, I still have a few copies of my book about the Argenta Historic District Available.  Contact me through my website or on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

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I MESSED UP!

I spent two weeks painting these six “word portraits” to take with me to the Delta Arts Festival in Newport last week, and not a one sold!  Guess I thought others would like the words of scripture displayed in their house.  I was inspired by my priest’s chasuble he wears Sundays in ordinary time.  It says “HOLY, HOLY, HOLY” across the front.  At any rate, here are the images — the acrylic paintings are 11 x 14″ and I’ll sell any of them for $25.  The embellishments are symbolic – at least to me!  Might make nice gifts — who knows!  Comment if you like them, please

peace believe hope joy love trust

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: Interior scene in 2 pt. perspective

interior 2ptFollow along with me as I show you how to draw an interior scene in 2 point perspective.  This is the same scene as the last one, only we’re looking at the corner of the room instead of the back wall.

Draw a rectangle 8″ high and 10″ wide in the middle of your large drawing pad.  Draw your eye level a little above center so that you will have a lot of floor to play with.

Set your left and right vanishing points.

Close to the middle of your rectangle, draw a vertical line about 2″ long — this will be the corner of your room.

To draw the ceiling, connect a line from the top of that corner to the left vanishing point and a line to the right vanishing point.

To draw the floor, connect a line from the bottom of the corner to the left vanishing point and another to the right vanishing point.  Do you see the floor and the ceiling now?

On one wall, draw a window and make sure your tops and bottoms are parallel — use the vanishing points.  Draw the window casing as well, if you can.  If you want, you may draw a door in the other wall as well.

To draw the floor tiles in 2-point perspective,  measure off 1″ marks on the floor line from the corner of the room along the wall.  Do this on both walls.  You will have to extend your floor lines all the way off the paper in order to make all the tiles.

From each of those points on the floor line, draw converging lines to the vanishing points.  If you do this on both walls, you will have tiles that grow smaller and smaller as they go back in space.  You can darken every other one of these so that you can see the pattern.

I know this is difficult — I hope you understood my directions.  Please let me know if I need to explain it further.  We’ll draw a house in a landscape for the next lesson in perspective.

 

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: INTERIOR IN 1 POINT PERSPECTIVE

HERE’S AN EXERCISE YOU CAN TRY TO UNDERSTAND 1 POINT PERSPECTIVE INSIDE A BUILDING.

INTERIOR SCENES ARE MUCH DIFFERENT FROM EXTERIOR.  PRETEND THAT YOU’RE IN A SMALL ROOM LOOKING AT THE BACK WALL –THERE IS EITHER A WINDOW OR A PAINTING ON THAT WALL, AND IT IS SEEN HEAD-ON.  IN YOUR SKETCHBOOK, DRAW AN 8″ SQUARE IN THE CENTER OF THE PAPER.  THEN DRAW A 4″ SQUARE EQUI-DISTANT FROM ALL SIDES WITHIN THE 8″ SQUARE.  PRETEND THIS IS THE BACK WALL OF YOUR ROOM.  DECIDE WHERE YOUR EYE LEVEL IS AND DRAW A HORIZONTAL LINE INTERSECTING BOTH SQUARES.  SELECT A VANISHING POINT ON YOUR HORIZON LINE.  NOW DRAW CONVERGING LINES FROM THAT VP TO THE CORNERS OF THE BACK WALL (NOT THE CORNERS OF THE SQUARE – NOTICE).  DRAW DOORS, WINDOWS WITH CONVERGING LINES THAT MEET AT THE VANISHING POINT. NOTICE THAT YOU CAN ONLY SEE THE FRAMING OF WINDOWS/DOORS ON THE BACK SIDE.

TO DO THE TILE FLOOR MEASURE OFF 1/2″ DIVISIONS ON THE BACK WALL EXTENDING BEYOND YOUR SQUARES IF YOU CAN.  DRAW CONVERGING LINES TO THE VP FROM THESE POINTS.  THIS GIVES YOU THE ANGLES OF BOARDS OR TILES PERPENDICULAR TO THE SIDE WALLS.  NOW, IF YOU WANT SQUARE TILES, START AT THE BASE OF YOUR PICTURE PLANE (THE 8″ SQUARE) AND MEASURE OFF 1″ UP AND DRAW YOUR FIRST HORIZONTAL LINE (THIS IS CALLED A TRANSVERSAL).

NOW, CONTINUE TO DRAW DIAGONALS ACROSS THE FLOOR FROM THE INTERSECTIONS OF THE CONVERGING LINES.  CONTINUE IN THE SAME MANNER TO MAKE CHECKERBOARD TILES.  DARKEN ALTERNATE TILES SO THAT YOU CAN SEE THE PATTERN.  ERASE THE LINES YOU NO LONGER NEED.

interiorI REALIZE THIS WILL BE DIFFICULT FROM A WRITTEN EXPLANATION.  I USUALLY DEMONSTRATE THIS IN MY CLASSES, AND STUDENTS FOLLOW ALONG AS I DRAW.  LET ME KNOW IF YOU CATCH ON TO THIS OR NOT.  A TWO-POINT INTERIOR SCENE IS NEXT!

WORKING WITH PERSPECTIVE – AERIAL OR ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVE

Well, I just realized that I had not posted anything about working with perspective — both aerial and linear.  This is an omission my teaching career couldn’t withstand! So I’m going to write a few posts about this subject before giving up!

If you are a realistic painter, or just want to show some depth in your paintings, you need to know something about perspective. 

THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF PERSPECTIVE: AERIAL AND LINEAR

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE OR ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVE:  If you have drawn or painted a still life subject, you probably wanted to show these objects in space.  It was shallow space, of course, but was still important.  In a landscape, aerial perspective is most important, since you usually have a foreground, a middle ground, and a background.  How do you effectively represent these different planes?

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE INCLUDES THESE ELEMENTS: 

  1. OVERLAPPING
  2. DETAIL
  3. VALUE
  4. INTENSITY
  5. POSITION
  6. SIZE.

If you look at two objects in space that are similar, but one is farther away than the other, what happens?  The one farther away looks smaller, lighter in value, lower in intensity, not as clearly defined, and may be overlapped by the one in front.  Take a look at this example:

Cloudy Skies

How do you know which tree is the closest even though the other trees may be the same size?  It is larger, close to the bottom of the picture plane, in more detail, darker, and overlaps the trees and mountains in the distance.  What happens to the trees and mountains in the distance?  They are lighter in value, less intense, show no detail, are much smaller.  The mountains in particular are low in intensity, appearing more lavender and gray. 

 

farmlandHere’s is another example:  In this painting, we know that the hay bale on the bottom left is much closer to the viewer than the others because of its position.  Is there a definite foreground, middle ground, and background here?  The foreground hill is more golden (more intense) than the three other hills as they move backward in space.  It’s important to look closely at the natural landscape to see how this works.

My next posts will be about linear perspective — this is what happens when people start putting buildings, houses, barns, etc. in the landscape!

 

 

 

 

 

COLOR THEORY: COMPOSITION IN TRIADS

TRIAD

 

First of all, I’ve had computer problems this week, so I’m late in posting this.   I’m back on track however!

If you divide the color wheel equidistantly, you will have a triangle  and thusly, a triadic color scheme.  This becomes a highly contrasting scheme and could be difficult to pull off! You will need to mix two of the colors together to make semineutrals.  Your scheme will be either warm or cool dominant depending on the intense color used.  If done well, you will have an exciting color composition.

Use of the three primary colors (red, blue, and yellow) become a triadic color scheme, but some of the other colors are easier to work with.  This first example is using Ultramarine Blue, Indian Red, and Hooker’s Green.  These correspond to blue-violet, yellow-green, and red-orange on the color wheel.  I didn’t use a lot of neutrals in this. so there’s a lot of intensity.

TRIAD1

In this next example, I used Manganese Blue, Raw Sienna, and Violet.  These relate to blue-green, yellow-orange, and red-violet on the color wheel. I subdued the violet and raw sienna, so that the yellow-orange is dominant.  Which one do you like the best?  It’s a lot of fun trying out these color exercises, not to mention how much you learn from them.  If you’re interested in this, read Stephen Quiller’s book, Color Choices: Making Sense out of Color Theory.  That’s where I got my inspiration.

TRIAD2

COLOR THEORY: SPLIT-COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME

Split complementary

The split-complementary color scheme is just what it says:  the complement of one color is split on either side so that it is a 3-color scheme.  What happens is that one color temperature becomes dominant and the other is subordinate.  Another way of looking at is is to select three analogous colors and then look for the complement of the middle color.  In this way, a harmonious relationship is provided as well as an accent color that enlivens the composition.  This color scheme is found in nature most often with the hues blue, green, and orange.

To choose your colors, ask yourself what mood you want to convey.  Cool colors convey a feeling of peace and calm while warm colors could be used to show activity, vibrancy, brightness.   One or two colors could be neutralized while the accent color is used in its intensity.

In my first example, I used a split-complementary scheme of yellow, orange-red, and blue violet.  The analogous colors where used predominantly, and the blue-violet was subdued and used only sparingly.  It’s a hot summer day!

warm

In my second example, I used a split-complementary scheme of red-violet, blue-violet, and yellow.  The warms are dominant, and the yellow is partly subdued.  A night scene is suggested.  This is a good exercise for you to try – let me know how it turns out!

cool

 

 

 

 

 

 

PATCHWORK COUNTY: ANOTHER EXPERIMENT IN ABSTRACTION

     In this abstracted 16 x 16″ landscape, I was trying to use one of the six basic  value  schemes mentioned by Edgar Whitney.  The scheme was a little dark with a lot of light in medium values.  I seldom use this value scheme; that’s why I wanted to try it.  I also wanted to continue breaking up the picture plane into sections, but still be able to lead the eye movement to the center of interest (the barn in the upper right area).  As usual, I worked out the value and color scheme in my sketchbook and decided to use a split-complementary color scheme: blue, red orange, orange, and yellow orange.  The acrylic colors I used were Cadmium Orange, Hansa Yellow, Indian Yellow,  Thalo Blue, Prussian Blue, Raw sienna, Burnt Sienna, Cadium Red Light and Titanium White.  (At least, that’s what I think I used — hard to remember now!)

SUMMER FIELDS: A COMPOSITION IN SECTIONS

Summer Fields Here’s a new painting — an experiment, if you will.  This is acrylic on 16 x 16″ clayboard panel.  First, I worked out the design in my sketchbook although the inserted images changed as I painted on the panel.  Clayboard is not like canvas; I learned that I had to use several layers of acrylic to get the texture I desired.  I remembered that Terrance Corbin used to divide up his surface into smaller sections, and I love doing that!  Guess I’m an organizer at heart!  At any rate, I tried to vary the sizes of the segments and still have a way that the viewer could get through the entire piece.  That was done by the narrow pieces running through and the color repetitions.  I used only blue, yellow, orange, and green with some white, mixing the neutrals from these colors.  it was a lot of fun!

What do you think?