Blog Archives

3rd Pen and Ink Drawing Lesson

The objective for this lesson was to use ink washes in various tones to shorten the drawing time, even out the values, and pulling the elements together into a cohesive artwork. Pen and ink stokes were to be used mainly for details and texture. Students were to use 8 x 10″ black and white photos for their subject.

All first made a good drawing of the subject on sketchbook paper either free-handed or using a grid. Four small cups were set out with a little water in one, a little more in the second, more water in the 3rd, and the most in the 4th. We put a drop of India ink in each cup, thereby making 4 different values, plus the white of the paper and undiluted ink for the darkest tone.

We worked light to dark with a round watercolor brush, and made sure to let each value dry before adding another. Layering of values could also be used. When all the values were laid in, students used their pens to complete the painting. These really turned out great!

 

The homework assignment was to draw a still life composition with bottles, vases, etc. but instead of developing the positive shapes, students were to break up the negative shapes with patterns in pen and ink, thereby making the still life objects the negative instead of the positive.  Here’s my example of this assignment:

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2nd Pen and Ink Drawing Lesson

The second class on pen and ink drawing got serious about making strokes to indicate value, shape, and texture with several sizes of pen and ink nibs.  Some students used Rapidograph refillable pens while others used disposable Hybrid Technical pens in .3 and .6 sizes.  I first gave them papers with four bottle images that I had drawn.  They were to practice using hatching, cross-hatching, stipple, squiggle, or contour line to value the outlined bottles.  Here’s the image I used for this exercise:

After completion of this exercise, each student selected either an object brought from home or one of those supplied to draw in an 8 x 10″ size.  We reviewed the steps to drawing from life:

  1.  Draw the large shapes first
  2.  Map out the secondary shapes (including shadows, highlights, reflections)
  3.  Look for connecting shapes
  4.  Use the negative shapes

Really good drawings were made of these objects using a variety of strokes:

Here is my example:

They were to finish their drawings at home and bring an 8 x 10″ photo to work from next week.  We will be using ink washes as well as pen strokes to complete these drawings from a photo.

NEW CLASS IN MAUMELLE

farmlandWell, I’m going to teach an art class again — thought I was finished with that, but guess it’s in my “blood.”  Beginning September 15 (Thursday) from 1:30 – 3:30, I will be teaching a class on how to compose a work of art at the Maumelle Senior Wellness Center in Maumelle.  This is a seven week class, and will include examples, critiques, information, exercises, and perhaps occasional homework.  Students will use their own materials, as well as materials provided by the instructor.  I’ve had many years of experience teaching this subject, both in high school art classes, children’s classes, and adult classes.  A lot of the lessons will be based on the blogs I’ve shared on this site.  Cost is $45, and there is a maximum of eight students so call MSWC as soon as possible, if you want to register  (501- 851-4344).   I’m looking forward to seeing you and sharing my understanding of composition and design principles.

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: A FUN ASSIGNMENT

Knowing about how to use linear perspective doesn’t mean that you have to be a slave to it.  Using the principles of perspective in drawings and paintings that include buildings, posts, roads, etc. can become an internal knowledge that makes your artwork more realistic.  However, some artists like to distort reality and in doing so, distort perspective as well.  De Chirico is a prime example of this.  Some contemporary artists do this as well:  (from Artist Magazine, June 2010).

img017But here’s another way to use perspective creatively —  an imaginary residence high up in the sky!  This drawing uses 4 vanishing points — all related.  The vanishing points are on vertical and horizontal lines.  Try this in your sketchbook to work out your “dream house”!

 

4 point

DRAWING IN PERSPECTIVE: A COUNTRY HOME IN 2 POINT PERSPECTIVE

If you have drawn the country home that I showed last post, you may be ready to add an addition or a porch to your drawing.  Hopefully you have put in some windows, and maybe a chimney using the same converging lines to the vanishing points.  All you need to do to add a porch or extension is to bring a corner post forward and use the same vanishing points and vanishing traces to add the roof.  To add a center door, remember to make the x from each corner of the rectangle to find the center, and then position the door in the center.  Steps could be added in the same way.  A walkway that is parallel to the horizon line can also be added as per example.  To make the fence posts and fence, follow this sequence: Decide where you want the corner post and draw it in as a vertical shape.  Draw converging lines to the vanishing points from the bottom and the top of the corner post.  Establish the second post arbitrarily when you’d like it to be using the converging lines for the top and bottom.  Now, make an X from point to point of the first and second posts. This determines the center point between each post.  From the center of the X, draw another line to the vanishing point.  Then draw a diagonal line from the top of the first post through the middle of the second post.  Where that line crosses the bottom converging line is where to position the third post.  Continue drawing the rest of the posts in the same way, and do the other side the same way.  Elaborate the posts any way you wish, but you have fenced off your country property!  Remember to add trees and shrubs to make it homey…

Country homebuilding a fence

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: A COUNTRY HOME IN 2-POINT PERSPECTIVE

Country home

DRAWING A HOUSE FROM IMAGINATION IN TWO-POINT PERSPECTIVE

Let’s try to draw an imaginary country home using the concepts of two-point perspective.  Here are the steps I used:

  1.  On a large *18 x 24″) sheet of drawing paper, draw a horizon line and select two vanishing points as far away on the page as you can.  Then draw the front corner of the house approximately 2″ tall.   Draw vanishing lines from the top and bottom of this line to the vanishing points on the left and the right.
  2. Your imaginary house in this case will face to the right.  Draw vertical lines to establish the length and width of the building.  You have made a box similar to what we did before.
  3. On the wide part of the box, draw diagonal lines from corner to corner to find its center.  Extend a vertical line through this center point and extend it about 1 1/2″ above the top of your box.  This will define the height of the gable end of the roof.
  4. Connect the top of the gable with the vertical sides of the box at both ends, extending just a little beyond the side to make your eaves.
  5. Now draw a converging line from the gable peak to the left vanishing point.  This is the top of the roof.
  6. What about the back side of the roof?  To get this point, extend a vertical line from the right vanishing point all the way up as far as you can on your paper.
  7. From the left corner of the facing side, extend a converging line all the way up the left side of the gable until it meets extended line you drew from the right vanishing point.  Make a dot where these lines meet — this is called a vanishing trace. Where it intersects the top of the roof is where your roof ends.
  8. Extend a roof line a little beyond your left house end to make the roof.  From this point, draw a converging line to the vanishing trace.   Where it intersects the roof line is the end of your roof.
  9. So far, you have made a box-type house with a gabled roof.  You can make some windows on one side if you wish like you made windows in the indoor examples.  Next post, I’ll discuss how to make a front porch, a walkway, and a fence enclosing the property!

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: Interior scene in 2 pt. perspective

interior 2ptFollow along with me as I show you how to draw an interior scene in 2 point perspective.  This is the same scene as the last one, only we’re looking at the corner of the room instead of the back wall.

Draw a rectangle 8″ high and 10″ wide in the middle of your large drawing pad.  Draw your eye level a little above center so that you will have a lot of floor to play with.

Set your left and right vanishing points.

Close to the middle of your rectangle, draw a vertical line about 2″ long — this will be the corner of your room.

To draw the ceiling, connect a line from the top of that corner to the left vanishing point and a line to the right vanishing point.

To draw the floor, connect a line from the bottom of the corner to the left vanishing point and another to the right vanishing point.  Do you see the floor and the ceiling now?

On one wall, draw a window and make sure your tops and bottoms are parallel — use the vanishing points.  Draw the window casing as well, if you can.  If you want, you may draw a door in the other wall as well.

To draw the floor tiles in 2-point perspective,  measure off 1″ marks on the floor line from the corner of the room along the wall.  Do this on both walls.  You will have to extend your floor lines all the way off the paper in order to make all the tiles.

From each of those points on the floor line, draw converging lines to the vanishing points.  If you do this on both walls, you will have tiles that grow smaller and smaller as they go back in space.  You can darken every other one of these so that you can see the pattern.

I know this is difficult — I hope you understood my directions.  Please let me know if I need to explain it further.  We’ll draw a house in a landscape for the next lesson in perspective.

 

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: INTERIOR IN 1 POINT PERSPECTIVE

HERE’S AN EXERCISE YOU CAN TRY TO UNDERSTAND 1 POINT PERSPECTIVE INSIDE A BUILDING.

INTERIOR SCENES ARE MUCH DIFFERENT FROM EXTERIOR.  PRETEND THAT YOU’RE IN A SMALL ROOM LOOKING AT THE BACK WALL –THERE IS EITHER A WINDOW OR A PAINTING ON THAT WALL, AND IT IS SEEN HEAD-ON.  IN YOUR SKETCHBOOK, DRAW AN 8″ SQUARE IN THE CENTER OF THE PAPER.  THEN DRAW A 4″ SQUARE EQUI-DISTANT FROM ALL SIDES WITHIN THE 8″ SQUARE.  PRETEND THIS IS THE BACK WALL OF YOUR ROOM.  DECIDE WHERE YOUR EYE LEVEL IS AND DRAW A HORIZONTAL LINE INTERSECTING BOTH SQUARES.  SELECT A VANISHING POINT ON YOUR HORIZON LINE.  NOW DRAW CONVERGING LINES FROM THAT VP TO THE CORNERS OF THE BACK WALL (NOT THE CORNERS OF THE SQUARE – NOTICE).  DRAW DOORS, WINDOWS WITH CONVERGING LINES THAT MEET AT THE VANISHING POINT. NOTICE THAT YOU CAN ONLY SEE THE FRAMING OF WINDOWS/DOORS ON THE BACK SIDE.

TO DO THE TILE FLOOR MEASURE OFF 1/2″ DIVISIONS ON THE BACK WALL EXTENDING BEYOND YOUR SQUARES IF YOU CAN.  DRAW CONVERGING LINES TO THE VP FROM THESE POINTS.  THIS GIVES YOU THE ANGLES OF BOARDS OR TILES PERPENDICULAR TO THE SIDE WALLS.  NOW, IF YOU WANT SQUARE TILES, START AT THE BASE OF YOUR PICTURE PLANE (THE 8″ SQUARE) AND MEASURE OFF 1″ UP AND DRAW YOUR FIRST HORIZONTAL LINE (THIS IS CALLED A TRANSVERSAL).

NOW, CONTINUE TO DRAW DIAGONALS ACROSS THE FLOOR FROM THE INTERSECTIONS OF THE CONVERGING LINES.  CONTINUE IN THE SAME MANNER TO MAKE CHECKERBOARD TILES.  DARKEN ALTERNATE TILES SO THAT YOU CAN SEE THE PATTERN.  ERASE THE LINES YOU NO LONGER NEED.

interiorI REALIZE THIS WILL BE DIFFICULT FROM A WRITTEN EXPLANATION.  I USUALLY DEMONSTRATE THIS IN MY CLASSES, AND STUDENTS FOLLOW ALONG AS I DRAW.  LET ME KNOW IF YOU CATCH ON TO THIS OR NOT.  A TWO-POINT INTERIOR SCENE IS NEXT!

DRAWING WITH PERSPECTIVE: BOXES IN ONE-POINT AND TWO-POINT PERSPECTIVE

boxes   The easiest way to learn about 1 point and 2 point perspective is to draw simple open boxes above and below the horizon line (eye level).  On the left of the example are open boxes in 1 point perspective – one is above the horizon line and one is below. We will begin with the box on the left (1 point).

First, draw a horizon line and a square above the line and a square below the line.  Above the line you will see the bottom of the box; below the line you will see the top of the box (makes sense).  Now, select a vanishing point on the line.  On the top square, draw lines (orthogonals) from all four corners directly to that vanishing point.

Draw a horizontal line determining the width of the lower panel.  Now you see a 3-dimensional box.  But what if the box is open?  Draw perpendicular lines from the corners of the bottom panel that meet the orthogonals at the top of the box.  Now draw a horizontal line from those points that is parallel to the bottom line.

Erase the lines you don’t need and darken in the rear of the 3-dimensional box that you see.

Try doing the same thing on the bottom box in reverse.  Sometimes you can’t see the inside of the box depending on where your vanish point is and how deep you make your box.

Next time, we’ll draw a box in 2 point perspective.  By the way, it helps to use a t-square and triangle.

DRAWING THE HUMAN FIGURE

It’s been a while since I blogged — had a lot going on in my life lately.  Today, I’m merely passing along some information about drawing the human form that I’ve gleaned from books and magazines.  Unfortunately, I have no idea WHAT books and magazines I got these from.  Suffice it to say that my students learned a lot from these charts.  The first one is about the growth of children. You can see from this why babys’ heads and eyes always seem to be so big– they don’t grow as fast as the other parts of the body.  I apologize for the darkness of the example — it was on colored paper!

 Growth chart

This next chart illustrates how the different sections of the body can be seen as basic forms: cylinders, spheres, wedges. It is much easier to draw figures if you think about various parts as simply shapes and forms.

shapes of body

In the future, I probably will not be posting drawing/painting lessons from my classes.  Instead, I will be sharing the artwork I have finished lately, or working on at the present.  I may be hanging up my apron as an art teacher!  At least for the summer!  Happy drawing to all of you!